Dog with kitten in treatment at the Veterinary Emergency and Specialty Center of Northern Arizona

Your pet may intentionally ingest a toxin, or become poisoned through accidental exposure.

Signs may include:

  • Vomiting and/or Diarrhea
  • Excessive salivation
  • Depression/lethargy
  • Changes in behavior (anxious, shivering)
  • Painful abdomen
  • Seizures
  • Staggering/unconsciousness
  • Bleeding or bruising
  • Breathing difficulties (panting, gasping)

First Aid:

  • If you have seen or know that your pet has ingested a toxin, call Poison Control:
    https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control
  • If you suspect your pet has ingested a toxin, contact a veterinarian immediately.
  • Do not begin treating your pet until you have spoken to a veterinary staff member.
  • For some toxins you may be advised to induce vomiting with Hydrogen Peroxide.
  • Transfer the animal to a veterinary facility as soon as possible. Bring a sample of the suspected toxin with the original container to the veterinary facility.

Prevention:

  • Become familiar with common toxins (see below), to avoid accidental exposure.
  • Do not rely on packaging to keep your pets out of trouble. Unlike children, animals can and will chew through child safety closures.
  • Keep all medications and chemicals out of your pets' reach. (Remember they can jump or even reach through cages.)
  • Do not administer any medications (no matter how seemingly harmless or mild) to an animal without first contacting a veterinarian.
  • Many drugs intended for one species will kill another species if given in even the smallest dosages.

 

Sample Toxins

Ethylene Glycol (Antifreeze)
Ethylene glycol is most commonly found in antifreeze, but can also be found in some detergents, paints, polishes, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Because of its sweet taste it is one of the more common poisonings seen in dogs and cats. A mere four ounces of ethylene glycol can be fatal to a 60-pound dog or 1-1/2 teaspoons to an average 10-pound cat. Even walking through an antifreeze contaminated puddle, then licking the paws can be enough to produce toxic signs.

Signs are seen within half hour to 12 hours of ingestion:

  • Drunken gait, staggering
  • Depression
  • Vomiting
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death

First Aid: Transfer the animal to a veterinary facility as soon as possible. Treatment must be started as soon as possible to increase chance of survival. If you see your animal ingest any amount of ethylene glycol seek veterinary attention

Prevention: Use and encourage your neighbors and friends to use propylene glycol-based antifreeze.
Do not allow your pets to drink or walk through water puddles from which you do not know the origin.


Chocolate
Dogs and cats cannot metabolize the theobromine (caffeine like) in chocolate, potentially causing serious stomach upset, nervous excitement, fast heart rate and/or blood disorders. As little as one ounce of milk chocolate per 20 pounds is enough to create toxin signs. Semi-sweet chocolate and baker's chocolate require much less amounts to cause serious signs.

Signs:

  • Vomiting and/or diarrhea
  • Hyperactivity and excitement
  • Seizures
  • Severe depression
  • Coma
  • Death

First Aid: Transfer the animal to a veterinary facility as soon as possible. You may or may not be instructed to induce vomiting.

Prevention: Keep all chocolates well out of reach of pets. Remember, the smell is intense, they will chew through bags, jump, or climb on counters to reach the treat. Beware of placing any wrapped gift packages within pets' reach especially during holidays, they may contain chocolates.


Xylitol
Xylitol is a sugar free sweetener used more commonly in Sugar Free Gum.
It increased the sensitivity if the animals to their own insulin and causes life threatening hypoglycemia (Low blood sugar). It also causes liver damage.

Signs:

  • Vomiting and/or Diarrhea
  • Severe depression
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death

First Aid: Transfer the animal to a veterinary facility as soon as possible. Low blood sugar can be fatal within hours.

Prevention: Keep all sugar free gum well out of reach of pets. Remember, the smell is intense, they will chew through bags, jump, or climb on counters to reach the treat. Beware of placing any wrapped gift packages within pets' reach especially during holidays, they may contain chocolates.


Common Toxins:

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control

Acetaminophen
Alcohol
Antifreeze
Antihistamines
Ammonia
Aspirin Barbiturates
Caffeine
Carbamates
Carbon Monoxide
Crayons
Chocolate
Copper pennies
Cosmetics
De-icers
DDT
Drugs (marijuana, etc.)
Deodorants
Denture cleaners
Disinfectants
Drain cleaners
Fertilizers
Fireplace colors
Fireworks

 Fleet Enemas
Fluoride
Furniture polish
Gasoline
Gila Monsters
Glues and adhesives
Hair Sprays
Hair colorings
Insecticides
Ibuprofen
Insects
Indoor plants
Livestock dips
Lye
Lead
Matches
Metal cleaners
Nail polish
Nicotine
OFF insect spray
Onions
Organophosphate
Overheated fat
 Oven cleaners
Paint/varnish remover
Perfumes
Petroleum Distillates
Pine Oil Disinfectants
Pyrethrin’s
Rodenticides
Rubbing alcohol
Rust removers
Scorpions
Shampoo
Snakes
Spiders
Spoiled foods
Strychnine
Styptic pencils
Suntan lotion
Tar
Tiger Moths
Toilet bowl cleaners
Toads
Warfarin
Wax

 

Common Poisonous Plants:

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control

Castor Bean
Daphne
Foxglove
Larkspur

Lily of the Valley
Lobelia
Mistletoe
Monkshood

Poison Hemlock
Sago Palm
Water Hemlock
Yew

 

 

Contact Us

Phone: 928-779-5522
Fax 928-286-5136
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Normal Values

NORMAL VALUES:

Dog
Temperature: 99.5-102.5
Pulse: 80-140
Respirations (breaths/min): 14-40

Cat
Temperature: 100-102.5
Pulse: 150-180
Respirations (breaths/min): 20-40